Traditional Hand Weaver

A.W.Barnes

About

A descendent of Scottish weavers, I learned to weave at the Textile Art Center in Brooklyn, NY. I also studied at the Marshfield School of Weaving, where I was taught traditional Scottish weaving techniques, a method I use today. I specialize in making blankets (48”x 72”) and tea towels. I gravitate toward tartan twills, although I have also woven cloth in houndstooth, herringbone, and bird’s eye, among others. I am particularly attracted to grids, an influence from the artist Agnes Martin. When I am not weaving, I am the Dean of the School of the Arts, Communication, and Global Studies at York College of Pennsylvania. I have a Ph.D. in English Literature with a focus on Shakespeare and metaphysical poets like John Donne and George Herbert, and an M.F.A. in Creative Writing with a focus on non-fiction from the Writing Seminars at Bennington College.

The Practice of wEAVINg

Weaving is a Zen practice. The movement of the boat across the warp, and the raising and lowering of harnesses is transfixing. A good weave registers in my body, the movements of the practice become part of me. Then, I know when things are going well when I feel the cadence of weaving, and I know when I have made a mistake when something feels wrong. Weaving is a mindfulness practice that forces me to stay in the present, but allows my mind to wander and at the same time to escape thought. Weaving is surprisingly mathematical: calculating the ends-per-inch, picks, width and length, and yardage. Of course, weaving is an art practice relying on a knowledge of color, material, and composition. This combination of the mathematical and the creative matches the left-brain/right-brain function of my mind. I am happiest living at the divide between the two. When the intellectual and the creative are in balance, I feel whole.

6 days ago
6 days ago
4 weeks ago
1 month ago
1 month ago
1 month ago
The Dark Eclipse

The Dark Eclipse

The Dark Eclipse is a book of personal essays in which author A.W. Barnes seeks to come to terms with the suicide of his older brother, Mike. Using source documentation—police report, autopsy, suicide note, and death certificate—the essays explore Barnes’ relationship with Mike and their status as gay brothers raised in a large conservative family in the Midwest.

Post-Closet Masculinities in Early Modern England

Post-Closet Masculinities in Early Modern England

Argues for a theory of male subjectivity that subordinates questions of desire beneath the historical imperatives that inform those desires. Employing a post-closet identity theory, this book argues that writers like John Donne, William Shakespeare, and George Herbert created an ideology of masculinity in conjunction with and in response to the great epistemological upheavals in early modern England.

Contact

To order a blanket for $350.00 plus shipping, please contact me.

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